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KC Oliver's Blog
Tuesday, 9 October 2007
INTERVIEW 6
 
INTERVIEW 6:

I am excited to welcome my next interviewee, the young novelist, Heather S. Ingemar, to my website. 
Heather is an adventurous writer who likes to dabble in many different genres.  Her latest novel from Echelon Press is Darkness Cornered and she also has an Echelon download available called A Slip of Wormwood.   Coming soon from Echelon Press is Heather's novella, Prophet's Choice.
Check out Heather Ingemar at her website to find out all the latest on this wonderful author.

I am thrilled to welcome Heather to my website.

Check out our interview below:
 
1.  Tell us a bit about yourself, the genre you write, and about your latest project.
Well, I live with my husband on a working cattle ranch, and I work evenings at the local library.  In my spare time, I write.  I really don't know what else to say beyond that....  (laughs)  As for my genre, I like to say that I write speculative fiction; it seems to fit the mish-mosh of genres I have stories in.  Paranormal, mystery, suspense, thriller, fantasy, science fiction, a tiny bit of romance.... yeah.  I don't think I've had two stories shelved the same.  I guess I'm a non-conformist. About my latest project....  well, if I told you, I'd have to kill you.  (laughs)  Just kidding!  I'm working on a series of short novels that are more urban fantasy in flavor, but have different religious mythology than the standard Christian one we all grew up with.  When my husband finished the first one, he snickered and said I'd be shelved in the Christian Fiction section, but I think they're a bit too 'out there' for that.  The first one is currently out to a couple publishers, and I'm nearing the end of the first draft on the second.  I think there will be three total, but don't hold me to it.  I may end up with more.....
2.  Did you choose your present genre; or did the genre choose you?
My genre chose me, definitely.  No question.  Contemporary, literary fiction bores me to death.  For as far back as I can remember, I've been thinking up tales with unusual circumstances.
3.  What would be a typical day for you, as a day in the life of a writer?
A typical day?  Is there any such thing as a typical day for a rancher's wife?  (laughs)  On average....  I guess I'd say my day consists of different farm duties from feeding the stock to fixing fence, to loading/unloading hay, to moving the animals until around 4.30 in the afternoon when I get ready for work at the library.  Then, I'm at the library until 8pm, I come home and make dinner, write for an hour or two if I feel up to it, and then go to bed.  It's a little less crazy on days when I stay in to do the household chores like laundry and dishes.  When it comes to the writing end of things, I don't stress about it too much.  If hubby's on the tractor and he doesn't need my help, I'm curled up in the pickup with a notepad and pen.  I write when we're waiting at the parts store.  I sometimes write when I'm at the library, if there's nothing else to do.  I write when I get the chance.
4.  Have you always wanted to write?
Yes.  Have I always been able to, no.  There were times I'd swear off writing because it wasn't going the way I wanted.
5.  Where do you get your ideas for your stories?
I really have no idea.  (laughs)
6.  Are any of your characters based on real people?
Not really.  Well, let me clarify that.  Most of my characters do have some random traits of the people around me, but as for basing an entire character off someone I know, I tend to avoid that like the plague.  When you're writing about someone you know, you tend to leave out way too much, you leave your readers confused.  All my characters are my own.
7.  If you could be any one of your characters, which one would you be and why? 
Wow, um, let me think.  I think I'd like to be Viola, from an unpublished story I wrote a while back titled "Opening Minds."  She's a telekinetic, and I think it would be very cool to influence objects from a distance.  Could catch things falling from clear across the room, or help herd the cows without having to run so much.  It would be very cool.
8.  Do you do research for your novels? What was the most interesting person, place or thing you have researched?
Sometimes.  I read a lot as a kid, and I guess I'm one of those people who knows a little bit about a lot of things, so in most of the stories I write I haven't come across anything I needed to do a lot of research for.  But, on occasion, there are things I do need to research.  I've got another short I'm working on in addition to the series of short novels, that required I research steam boilers.  That was fascinating.
9.  Have you ever had writer’s block? And what do you do to overcome it?
I don't like the term writer's block.  It implies something permanent, insurmountable.  I believe there are times when your well of creativity runs a little low and the words are difficult to get onto the page, but it isn't the end of the world.  You just need to let it ride for a while, then come back and work on it.  That's what I do if I'm having difficulties, and it works.
10.  Do you have any advice for the young writer just starting out?
Research!  Research the industry, publishers, the craft itself.  There are too many scammers out there to just blunder through without having some sense of direction, and the more you know the better off you'll be in the long run.
11.  And just for fun, if you could be a Transformer, which would you be? An Autobot (the good bots) or a Decepticon (the evil bots)? =D
Actually, I haven't seen the movie yet....
 
Thanks for having me, KC!  This was a fun interview!

 

Thank you so much for joining me, Heather!

 

STAY TUNED, THERE ARE MORE GREAT INTERVIEWS TO COME!


Posted by kc-oliver at 8:00 PM EDT
Updated: Tuesday, 9 October 2007 8:19 PM EDT
Friday, 14 September 2007
INTERVIEW FIVE
 

It is exciting to have another young adult author visit my site and share a little bit of herself with us.  We have a lot in common and I am pleased to introduce this week's interviewee: young adult author, Grace E. Howell.

True Friends is Grace's latest YA novel from Echelon Press and is available at Echelon Press in paperback or via e-book from Fictionwise .
Also, coming soon from Echelon Press is Grace's fiction e-book, Severed Bond, a short story for grown-ups.
 
Check out her website at Grace E. Howell to find out all the latest on this wonderful YA author.

I am thrilled to welcome Grace to my blog.

Check out our interview below:

1.  Tell us a bit about yourself, the genre you write, and about your latest project.

 

Answer:

I have loved reading and writing since my earliest school days and would curl up in the corner of the couch lost in a book until my mother said, "Get your nose out of that book and . . ."  Naturally when I thought about writing for publication I knew I wanted to write for children and young adults because I want to share with young readers the same joy that I had reading a good book. As a classroom teacher and a school librarian nothing gave me greater pleasure than finding the right book for the right reader. My first published novel, is True Friends released in 2005 by Echelon Press. It is the story of 1918 Annie who must give up her tomboy days with the boys and become a proper girl.  As she worries about her brother overseas in the army, Annie must deal with accusations and prejudice at home until the Spanish flu unites the neighborhood with tragedy and loss.


2.  Did you choose your present genre; or did the genre choose you?


Answer:

In a way True Friends which is historical fiction chose me. I had heard many stories of World War I and the flu epidemic from people who had lived through it, or their parents had.  This became a story I had to write.  I don't think I prefer one particular genre because I like to read and write in various genres.  I still have a number of historical stories in my head, but now I am working on a contemporary, realistic fiction series about three seventh grade misfits who reluctantly develop a friendship.

 

3.  What would be a typical day for you, as a day in the life of a writer?

 

Answer:

I like to get to my computer early, after breakfast and exercises. I may get there on time, but then they start, the interruptions by phone, family, doorbell, etc. until all creative thoughts are battered and bruised trying to compete for my attention.  What I would like to say is a typical day would begin with answering emails, then writing undisturbed for a couple of hours when I would break for a walk outside in  my garden  with a cup of coffee or tea. Back to the computer, writing until hunger pangs announced lunch time. After lunch would be another undisturbed time of writing.  Is that a dream or what?  That's my schedule, but it seldom happens that way.


4.  Have you always wanted to write?

 

Answer:

Yes, since the day I learned to read.


5.  Where do you get your ideas for your stories?

 

Answer:

Ideas spring up from everywhere constantly, so many I can't begin to pursue them all.  I get ideas from whatever I see, hear, read, experience in some way, a person, an animal, a newspaper article, an overheard conversation, on and on.


6.  Are any of your characters based on real people?

 

Answer:

Most of my characters are strictly invented using bits and pieces of people I've seen or met combined with my imagination. But the Bolman family in True Friends is patterned after my grandparents and their children.  My mother would have been Rose.


7.  If you could be any one of your characters, which one would you be and why?

 

Answer:

I know and love all my characters, but I'm not sure I would want to be any one of them any more than I would want to be somebody else I know.  I would like to meet and interact with the characters I write about.  But invented characters as well as real people have problems and quirks that may be harder to handle than what I'm blessed with. So I guess I'll have to be my characters, and they are part of me, only as writer and reader.


8.  Do you do research for your novels? What was the most interesting person, place or thing you have researched?

 

Answer:

I do a lot of research, especially for historical fiction, but a contemporary story also involves a great deal of research.  Before writing True Friends, I pictured people listening to the radio for news of the war. A little research taught me that radios did not exist for the public during World War I. The story I'm working on now is a contemporary story, Unlikely Alliance—DOGS!, and I studied Siberian Huskies, phobias, dogfights, cerebral palsy, and many other topics for it. In  Severed Bond,  a short story with a touch of the supernatural soon to be released by Echelon Press as an e-book, I had to research mounted police and nursing homes.  I may do more research than necessary, but I have a horror of a reader finding a mistake in one of my books and losing respect for me as a writer.


9.  Have you ever had writer’s block? And what do you do to overcome it?

 

Answer:

Not really.  If I start wondering how I should write a scene I can either take a walk or a shower and the ideas and words begin to flow.

 

10.  Do you have any advice for the young writer just starting out?

 

Answer:

Write what you know and have fun with your writing.


11.  And just for fun, if you could be a Transformer, which would you be? An Autobot (the good bots) or a Decepticon (the evil bots)?

 

Answer:

As I want nothing to do with machines smarter than I am, I would avoid Transformers with all my power.  But since you asked, I'm always on the good side in the battle against evil so I'd have to be an Autobot.

 

Stay tuned! 
And check back regularly for a new interview!


Posted by kc-oliver at 1:59 PM EDT
Updated: Monday, 17 September 2007 10:54 AM EDT
Wednesday, 5 September 2007
WEEK FOUR
 

 


 

 

On to the fourth interview of many more to come of some really great Echelon authors.

This week's interviewee is romance author, Anne Carter, who also writes young adult fiction as Pam Ripling.

Point Surrender is Anne's latest paranormal romance from Echelon Press and is available at (
http://www.amazon.com/Point-Surrende... )in paperback or via e-book from ( http://www.fictionwise.com/eBooks/eB... ).

Anne is also the author of StarCrossed Lovers, and A Hero's Promise, and coming soon, the third installment of the Starcrossed series, The Gypsy in Me. Check out as well, Anne's e-book novellas Starfire and When Harry met Soli.

As Pam Ripling, coming soon is her new young adult novel, Locker Shocker, from Echelon Press.

Check out Anne/Pam's website at (
http://www.beaconstreetbooks.com/ ) for more information about all her novels!

I am very excited to welcome Anne/Pam to my blog!

Check out our interview below!

1. Tell us a bit about yourself and the genre you write.

Answer:
I am a wife, a mother, a sister, an aunt; I'm a bookkeeper, a photographer, an ordained celebrant; a Virgo, a procrastinator, a lover of Mexican food and chocolate. I am a PTA Treasurer, a driver, a movie nut. Oh, yeah, and I am a published author.

I started writing in what they now call middle school, and got serious about it as an adult. My first publishing credit was for a poem in a magazine, then a short story in Thema. I wrote a lot of short, literary stories, then started on a romance which ultimately became a novel and then a qualified tome. I was published electronically at first, then in print-on-demand, and eventually, small press trade paperback.

2. Did you choose your present genre; or did the genre choose you?

Answer:
I was chosen, I suppose. I have never given it much thought, which means I probably didn't do any choosing.

3. Have you always wanted to write?

Answer:
In a word, yes. More like, needed to write.

4. What would be a typical day for you, as a day in the life of a writer?

Answer:
There are no typical days in my life. In an ideal world, I would be like Nora Roberts, I'd get up, grab a cuppa joe, sit down and write until mid day, get up, stretch, take a walk in the garden or play with my lovey-dovey Golden Sandie. Then I'd sit back down and write until dinner time.

As it is, I sit down late at night after all the chores are done, and "steal" a precious hour or so; I sneak away from accounting long enough to pen a chapter midday; I clear the calendar for a hookie day when I am hot on a story. It is, sadly, hit-and-miss.

5. Where do you get your ideas for your stories?

Answer:
Don't know. They just arrive fully formed in my head. But I will say that I have always been the observant type; I am always watching people, imagining what they are about. I am always looking at the details of the setting I am in. I just returned from 6 days in London, and my brain was hurting from all the input I had to store away. I started thinking right away about how I could steer my WIP into Great Britain for a scene or two...

6. Are any of your characters based on real people?

Answer:
Yes-ish. Like many authors, I often pick a public figure or celebrity to be the base model for my character, then alter them as I go along. In the end they may not really resemble the model figure, but something entirely different as they seem to "grow" their own personality.

In STARCROSSED HEARTS, one of my heroes was based on a young Paul Newman. My heroine started off as my favorite actress, Jane Seymour. I find when I don't start with a known, I have more trouble developing the character. Whom I choose might depend on who I've recently become familiar with. In POINT SURRENDER, my hero, Case McKenna, would have been played by Lord of the Rings medieval hunk, Viggo Mortenson.

7. If you could be any one of your characters, which one would you be, and why?

Answer:
Amy Winslow in POINT SURRENDER, because I am already in love with Case McKenna. (see above!) LOL. Plus the fact that she gets to live in a lighthouse. What could be more fun?

8. Do you do research for your novels? What was the most interesting person, place or thing you have researched?

Answer:
Speaking of lighthouses... I was privileged to stay in a lighthouse while penning the last few chapters of POINT SURRENDER. Talk about inspiration! And yes, I do lots of research. It's part of the fun. I learn a lot, I want my readers to learn, too, without knowing they are being taught. My WIP, CAPE SEDUCTION, takes place in both 2008 and 1948. The research for this book is really involving and very interesting. 1948 was a fascinating time in California.

9. Have you ever had writer’s block? If yes, what have you done to overcome it?

Answer:
Writer's Block? What's that? Okay, once or twice I've been stymied (is that the word?) But I've come to realize that if it happens, to me, it's usually because my story has taken the wrong turn. I try to go back to where that happened and go in a different direction.

10. Do you have any advice for the young writer just starting out?

Answer:
As a matter of fact, yes. Aside from the usual advice, such as Read! Read! Read! and Write! Write! Write!, I have to also say, start working on promotion early. Name recognition. Even if you are unpublished, start building a readership in advance. This is something I wish I'd done. There are so many places on-line to get your name out there, for free, it's a shame to not utilize them. Blogs, reviews, articles, comments, websites, etc. I've been preaching this to new Echelon teen author Alyssa Montgomery.

11. And just for fun, if you could be a Transformer, which would you be? An Autobot (the good bots) or a Decepticon (the evil bots)? =D

Answer:
I would be an Autobot. I would be a Mazda Miata that turns into a giant photographer taking pictures of all the action... while writing down notes at the same time...

Thanks, K.C., for a terrific interview!

Thank you so much, Anne, and Pam too ! =D

Stay tuned!
And check back each week for a new interview!


Posted by kc-oliver at 2:09 PM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 5 September 2007 3:09 PM EDT
Wednesday, 22 August 2007
WEEK THREE
 
WEEK THREE

Moving right along to week three of the
Echelon authors interviews.

This week's interviewee is
C.A. Verstraete. 

Christine is the winner of The Fast and Freaky Fiction
Writing Contest (October 2006)
for her e-story, The Witch Tree; available at Fictionwise. 
See link right after Christine's interview!
She is also the author of the nonfiction e-book, In Miniature Style, available at Writer's Exchange E-Publishing:  http://www.readerseden.com/manufacturers.php?manufacturerid=243

I am very excited to welcome Christine
to my blog!
Check out our interview below!
Interview:
1. Tell us a bit about yourself and the genre you write.

Answer:

I'm kind of a chameleon when it comes to writing. Being a journalist, I've written mostly non-fiction and then started to write short fiction. I enjoy writing mysteries and horror. My short story, "The Witch Tree," won a a "Fast and..." contest and was published by Echelon Press, LLC. www.echelonpress.com. My young adult mystery, "Searching for a Starry Night," has some spooky elements and involves two other favorite elements, dogs and dollhouse miniatures. It will be published in spring '08 by Quake, http://quakeme.com, a division of Echelon Press, LLC.

2. Did you choose your present genre; or did the genre choose you?

Answer:
I've always enjoyed reading mysteries, and being a long-time dollhouse miniatures collector, it seemed natural for my book to focus on the search for a missing miniature painting. You can see some of my work at my website, http://cverstraete.com.


3. Have you always wanted to write?

Answer:
One of my favorite baby photos is of me with a newspaper and a pencil stuck behind my ear, kind of prophetic. I remember always wanting to write and began with newspaper writing in junior college.


4. What would be a typical day for you, as a day in the life of a writer?

Answer:
I write pretty much every day so I can usually be found at my computer.


5. Where do you get your ideas for your stories?

Answer:
I'm lucky to have a vivid imagination. Sometimes a news story or something I see will spark an idea. Other times, I will get an idea or know how to finish a story by having it unfold in an dream.


6. Are any of your characters based on real people?

Answer:
I do picture certain persons as I write, but my characters are usually a composite of bits and pieces of different people. They're really figments of my imagination.


7. If you could be any one of your characters, which one would you be, and why?

Answer:
Hopefully, I'd be the smart one. ha! It's bad enough making mistakes in real life without having to assume those of your fictional characters, too!


8. Do you do research for your novels? What was the most interesting person, place or thing you have researched?

Answer:
It depends on what I am writing about. I do try to double-check facts to make sure the idea I had is right and my memory or idea of it isn't faulty. It is interesting to look up things you weren't sure of. I know I always learn something new!


9. Have you ever had writer's block? If yes, what have you done to overcome it?

Answer:
There are times when I've been stuck or something is not coming out the way I want, but since I write every day, I've never really been blocked. With deadlines, you don't have time to be blocked. If something isn't coming out right, I simply move on to something else and work on a different story for awhile, then go back to it. If I have to get it done that day, then that is my motivation to finish.

10. Do you have any advice for the young writer just starting out?

Answer:
Don't be afraid to write. Don't doubt yourself. You are usually your own worst enemy. If you have a talent, then don't let anyone, or anything, stand in your way of fulfilling your dreams.

11. And just for fun, if you could be a Transformer, which would you be? An Autobot (the good bots) or a Decepticon (the evil bots)? =D

Answer:
I'd definitely be a good bot. There is enough evil in the world!
Thank you so much, Christine!

DOWNLOAD AND ENJOY YOUR COPY OF THE WITCH TREE AT:
Fictionwise

Stay tuned! 
And check back each week for a new interview!


Posted by kc-oliver at 1:54 PM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 29 August 2007 12:16 AM EDT
Thursday, 9 August 2007
WEEK TWO
WEEK TWO
Welcome to week two of the Echelon authors interviews.
This week's interviewee is
T.C. Lo Tempio.
T.C. is the author of the wickedly
scary horror novel, Ebony. 
 As one reviewer puts it:
"Ebony is a supernatural, mystery packed read that will keep you nail-biting your way to the end. A well written story with great character development, local and intense drama. Don't miss this one!"
Shirley Johnson - Senior Reviewer of Midwest Book Review
 I am very excited to welcome T.C. to my website!
Check out our interview below:

 

Interview:

 

Tell us a bit about yourself, the genre you write, and about your latest project.

 

I was born in New York City, and have been writing in some form or another since I was about ten years old.  My favorite genre to write in is horror, but I have also done manuscripts in quirky chick lit and romantic suspense.  My latest project is a satire on soaps, entitled SOUTHERN DISH, currently being shopped to agents.  Also a paranormal mystery, HIGH MOON, is under consideration.  My latest published book, EBONY, was #2 in horror at Fictionwise for three weeks, and my next book, WITCH’S PAWN, will be released from Echelon in 2009.

 

Did you choose your present genre; or did the genre choose you?

 

A little of both, I think :-)  As a kid, I loved Nancy Drew mysteries and horror movies. My favorite book was The Secret in the Old attic because of the skeleton on the cover.

 

What would be a typical day for you, as a day in the life of a writer?

 

Since I hold down a full time job, I usually write on the weekends.    I set aside four hours on Saturday and Sunday to write.

 

Have you always wanted to write? – Yes.

 

Where do you get your ideas for your stories?

 

Sometimes it’s a word, or a phrase, or something I see – I got the inspiration for one book from the name on the side of a garbage truck.

 

Are any of your characters based on real people?

 

More than I’d care to admit.  Yes.

 

If you could be any one of your characters, which one would you be and why?

 

I think I would be Chancey O’Neill from Southern Dish, just because she’s so outrageous and in your face.

 

Do you do research for your novels?  What was the most interesting person, place or thing you have researched?

 

Yes.  For example, for EBONY, I researched voodoo from top to bottom.  And for Bound by Blood, I had to learn to read Tarot cards, which is by far the most interesting thing I’ve ever done.  They fascinate me. And it’s amazing how much of that stuff actually comes true.

 

Have you ever had writer’s block?  And what do you do to overcome it?

 

Oh, baby, yes.  There are many days I sit and stare at the screen, or what I write is pure you know what.  To overcome it, I usually take a break, play with my cats, and watch a movie.

 

Do you have any advice for the young writer just starting out?

 

Grow a thick skin.  Rejection is a way of life. Don’t take it personally.

 

And just for fun, if you could be a Transformer, which would you be?  An Autobot (the good bots) or a Decepticon (the evil bots)?  =D   

 

Decepticon – the bad girls have all the fun, dontcha know!!!!

 

Thank you so much Toni!
To get your copy of Ebony

Stay tuned! 
And check back each week for a new interview!


Posted by kc-oliver at 1:08 AM EDT
Updated: Thursday, 9 August 2007 1:31 AM EDT
Tuesday, 31 July 2007
WEEK ONE
 

 

Welcome to the pet project of a great group
of authors from Echelon Press!
We have gotten together and are interviewing
one another or writing essays that we are posting
weekly to our numerous websites and blogs,
creating exposure for us all!

I will post the links to the interviews conducted
on yours truly, just as soon as they are available.

My first interviewee is Kerul Kassel.
Kerul is a non-fiction author of the book:
www.StopProcrastinatingNow.com
And, the soon-to-be-released book called:
Productive Procrastination (Echelon Press, 2007)

I am very excited to welcome Kerul to my Blog!
Check out our interview below:

Tell us a bit about yourself and the genre you write.

I'm a fairly new author, and my writing was inspired by my clients and workshop participants. I found so many people beating themselves up about what they hadn't accomplished in life, and it was weighing them down, draining them of energy, and that was so unnecessary! I wanted to help them let go of that punishing perspective and replace it with a new lively, fun, experimental, forward-thinking one, and I could reach more people by writing a book. You guessed it, I write non-fiction, specifically about procrastination: www.StopProcrastinatingNow.com/book.

Did you choose your present genre; or did the genre choose you?

It definitely chose me. But I’ve always been a non-fiction sort. I do love fiction, but the books I’ve collected tend to be reference oriented, such as field guides, how-to’s, photographic essays, books on psychology, philosophy, literature compendiums, animal behavior, and more recently, self-help.

Have you always wanted to write?

Not in any definite way – I’ve always just wanted to be happy! At times in my life, writing has been a path to that, sometimes through journaling, at other times through telling a personal story or documenting a situation or event, and more recently, to help me get clear on and communicate good ways of mastering one’s goals, dreams, and time.

Have you ever had writer’s block? If yes, what have you done to overcome it?

Writer’s block was a frequent companion during the writing of my first book. The block was usually doubts about the value and originality of what I was writing, what other people would think of it, the quality of the style, grammar and voice, etc. At that time I had a coach who suggested that whenever I made an appointment with myself to write and found no words forthcoming, that I make a diary of sorts, just to spill out of my brain whatever was in it to free up some “RAM”, so to speak. It worked, and in my next book, Productive Procrastination, The Procrastination Diary is included – an almost daily account of the struggle with writer’s block. I hope it helps give people a sense of humor and ideas for options when they’re putting something off because it feels uncomfortable, scary, overwhelming, or difficult.

Do you have any advice for the young writer just starting out?

Write, write, and write some more, and write for yourself first, for fun next, and for others last. I know that you’re supposed to write for your “target market”, but your voice will be truer if it’s really you, and you care about what you’re writing about and are enjoying the process. Some people write for the joy of it, some people write for pleasure, some people write because they want to inspire or entertain or educate, and some write for money. What fun if you can do all of those things!

And just for fun, if you could be a Transformer, which would you be? An Autobot (the good bots) or a Decepticon (the evil bots)? =D

I’d definitely be a good bot, but I can’t pretend to know anything about Transformers. If there’s a transformer that empowers people, has purple and pink in it, loves animals, and is a protector of the environment, that’d be me.

Thank you so much Kerul!

Stay tuned!

And check back each week for a new interview!

 

Posted by kc-oliver at 12:36 AM EDT
Updated: Thursday, 9 August 2007 1:32 AM EDT
Monday, 23 July 2007
COMING SOON!!!
 
Exciting interviews/essays of my fellow author from Echelon Press!
Stay tuned!  And keep checking back.

Cheers! 

KC Oliver

Young Adult Author of "Pretty Pretty"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit my website:  kc-oliver.tripod.com/


Posted by kc-oliver at 8:07 PM EDT
Updated: Monday, 23 July 2007 9:10 PM EDT

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